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Full text of "Tubman High School for Girls 1922-1923"

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LD7501 
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TUBMAN 
HIGH SCHOOL 

FOR GIRLS 




AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 
1922-23 



REESE LIBRARY 




LIBRARY USE ONLY 

REESE LIBRARY 

Augusta College 

Augusta, Georgia 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/tubmanhs19221923rich 



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COURSE OF STUDY 



' ~' 



TUBMAN HIGH SCHOOL 

FOR GIRLS 



AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 
1922-23 



Session of 1922-23 Begins on Monday, Sept. 18th. 



Students Register and Secure Admission Cards During 
the Week Beginning Monday. Sept. 11th. 



RICHMOND COUNTY (GEORGIA) 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 



THE TUBMAN HIGH SCHOOL is the girls' high school 
of the pubHc school system of the city of Augusta and Richmond 
County. 

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD 

Mr. James L. Fleming, President 
Dr. T. E. Oertel. J'iee-Presideiif 
Mr. Lawton B. Evans, Secretary 
and Superliiteiideiit of Schools 

HIGH SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Mr. T. I. Hickman, Chair)itaii 

Mr. C. E. Whitney Mr. H. L. Murphey 

Mr. W. R. Johnston 

Mr. C. T. Fund Mr. William Martin 



LAWTON B. EVANS 
Superintendent of Schools 

FACULTY 

T. H. GARRETT 

Principal 

MISS A. DOROTHY HAINS 

Latin 

MISS ADA G. WOODS 

English 

MISS ANNIE M. PAGE 

French 

MISS JULIA A. FLISCH 

U. S. History and Economics 

MISS GERTRUDE J. COMEY 

English 

MISS LOUISE PARKS 

English 

MISS WILLAMETTE GREEN 

Mathematics 

MISS ANNA H. WARD 

Commercial Geography 

MRS. MARGARET C. HURST 

Ancient History 

MISS MARY E. HAMILTON 

Mathematics 

MISS FURLOW HOLLINGSWORTH 

Commercial Svibects 

MISS MARCIA A. CLARK 

Domestic Arts 

MISS LOIS EVE 

General Science 

MISS LORA M. PEARCE 

English 

MRS. W. C. EMERSON 

Physics and Gen. Science 

MISS HELEN E. PARK 

English riSAKK 

3 



MISS MILDRED ABERNATHY 
Latin 

MISS KATHERINE M. COMFORT 
Applied Art 

MISS LENORA IVEY 

Physical Training 

MISS LOUISE CHILES 

English 

MISS JEANNE TURNER 

Vocal Music 

MISS AMA LEE NULL 

Spanish 

MISS ELEANOR BOATWRIGHT 

Civics and Modern History 

MISS EDWINE W. ODOM 

Chemistry and Bio'ogy 

MISS NANCY E. HADDOCK 

Domestic Science 

MISS ANN BRADDY 

Mathematics 

MISS SALLIE RUTLEDGE 

General Science 

MISS MARION HAMILTON 

Civics and Ancient History 

MISS HELEN ANDERSON 

French 

MISS MADELYN THOMSON 

Mathematics 

MISS BERNICE ADAMS 

Mathematics 

MISS LEAH WHITE 

Assistant Commercial Dept. 

MISS EMMA PLUNKETT 

Assistant Gymnasium 

MRS STANNARD OWENS 

Librarian 

MISS LOUISE WILSON 

School Secretarv 



COURSES OF STUDY 

1922-23 

SUB-FRESHMAN 

(Same for all Students) 

English, a periods; Arithmetic (1st term), 5; Algebra (2nd term), 5; 
Industrial Geography, 4; Latin (College Preparatory Course, 2nd term), 4; 
Ancient History, 5; Physical Training, 2. Elect: Applied Art; Domestic 
Science; or Domestic Art; Music (2), 4 periods. 



Year 



College Prep. 



English 5 

Latin 5 

Algebra 5 

Gen. Science .... 5 

Phvs. Tr 2 

Elect One 

Do. Science 4 

Do. Art 4 

Applied Art 4 

Music 2 

26 



Modern Language 



FLnglish o 

Latin 3 

Algebra 5 

French 5 

Phvs. Tr 2 

Elect One 

Do. Science 4 

Do. Art 4 

Applied Art 4 

Music 2 

26 



English 5 

Latin 5 

French 5 

Geometry 5 

Phvs. Tr. 2 

Elect One 

Do. Science 4 

Do. Art 4 

Applied Art 4 

Music 2 



P^nglish 5 

Latin 1 

or 1^ 5 

Biologv J 

U. S. History.... 5 

Chemistry 6 



English 5 

Civics 5 

Algebra 5 

Gen. Science .... 5 

Phvs. Tr 2 

Elect One 

Do. Science 4 

Do. Art 4 

Applied Art 4 

Music 2 



26 



English 5 

French 5 

Mod. History.... 5 

Algebra 5 

Phvs. Tr 2 

Elect _ One 

Do. Science 4 

Do. Art 4 

Applied Art 4 

Music 2 

2(1 

English 5 

French 5 

Chemistry 1 

or 
Economics J 

Geom. (4b) 5 

Phvs. Tr 2 

Elect One 

Do. Science 4 

Do. Art 4 

Applied Art 4 

Music 2 

26 



English 5 

French 5 

U. S. History.... 5 

Geometry 5 

Elect One 
Do. Science 4 



French 5 , Music 



26 



26 



Science 

English .5 

Civics 5 

Algebra 5 

Gen. Science .... 5 

Phys. Tr 2 

Elect One 

Do. Science 4 

Do. Art 4 

Aoolied Art 4 

Music 2 

26 

PZnglish J 

Mod. History.... 5 

Algebra 5 

French 5 

Phvs. Tr 2 

Elect One 

Do. Science 4 

Do. Art 4 

Applied Art 4 

Music 2 



English 3 

Chemistry 6 

Biology 6 

Geometry 5 

Phys. Tr 2 

Drawing 2 

Music 2 

28 

English 5 

Physics 6 

U. S. History.... 5 

Solid Geom 3 

Phvs. Tr 2 

Elect One 

Do. Science 4 

Applied Art 4 



Commercial 

English .■) 

Algebra 

Gen. Science 

Civics .5 

Phvs. Tr 

Elect One 

Do. Science 4 

Do. Art 4 

Applied Art 4 

Music 2 

26 

English j 

Com. Arith 4 

Mod. History.... ."> 

Spanish .j 

Phvs. Tr 2 

Elect One 

Do. Science 4 

Do. Art 4 

Applied Art 4 

Music 2 

2.") 

English .-, 

Spanish .J 

Stenography .... 5 

Typewriting 7 

Phvs. Tr 2 

Elect One 

Do. Science 4 

Do. Art 4 

Applied Art 4 

Music 2 

28 



English 5 

Bookkeeping .... 6 
Typewriting .... 5 
Stenography .... 5 
U. S. History.... 5 
Phys. Tr 2 

28 



Figures in above outline show the number of periods (45 minutes) a 
week a subject is taken. The standard requirement is 20 periods of work 
in .") period subjects and an elective subject as indicated. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



Students are admitted to the Tubman High School on pre- 
sentation of promotion cards from the seventh grades of the 
pubhc schools. Applicants for admission from other schools 
will be required to stand examinations, or present other satisfac- 
tory official evidence of being prepared to do high school work, 
x^pplicants for admission to the upper classes will be required to 
present certificates showing satisfactory completion of subjects 
of the lower high school classes, or take examinations in the sub- 
jects for which they ask credit. Only the certificates of ac- 
credited schools will be accepted. All students, both old and 
new, are required to get Class Cards from the Principal's office 
during the week preceding the opening of school. 

There is no tuition fee of any kind at the Tubman High 
Schools for girls who are residents of Augusta or Richmond 
County. Girls who are not residents of Augusta or Richmond 
County are classified as non-residents. They are required to 
pay a tuition fee of sixty dollars ($60.00) for the school year. 
Thirty dollars of this amount is payable at the school when the 
student registers and thirty dollars between February 1st and 
15th following. 

All text books and supplies used in the Tubman High School 
may be bought at the school. No profit is made on the books 
sold. Only the actual cost of handling is added to the publishers' 
prices. This plan is not only a convenience to the students, but 
a substantial saving in the cost of books is made. No books are 
charged. Every book must l)e paid for wdien purchased. 

COURSES OF STUDY 

The Tubman High School ofifers four Courses of Study as 
follows: COLLEGE-PREPARATORY, MODERN LANG- 
UAGE, SCIENCE, and COMMERCIAL. An outline of the 
subjects taken will be found on page five of this pamphlet. Stu. 
dents must select one of these courses on entrance into the high 
school. The selection of a course is of the highest importance. 

Parents and students are urged to study the outline of Courses 

6 



of Study carefully, and to consult with the Principal before the 
selection of the course. While provision is made for changing 
courses after the first or second years for good reasons, such 
changes are generally difficult to make, and sometime occasion 
irregularities in the requirements for graduation which are im- 
possible to overcome. No changes in courses of study are per- 
mitted except with the approval of the Principal. A subject not 
conpleted in any year must be taken again in the following year, 
otherwise no credit towards graduation is allow in that subject. 

The Courses of Study are designed to meet the requirements 
that arise from the individual needs of the students. Students 
select work in courses or groups of study rather than by indi- 
vidual subjects. A limited selection of subjects under strict 
faculty guidance is permitted for special reasons. The Courses 
of Study are all so arranged as to require practically the 
same amount of work in each. They are so organized into re- 
lated groups of study as to ofTer every opportunity for individual 
development. 

Tlw CoUcijc-Frcpanitory Course, as its name indicates, has been 
arranged for those students who will, on completion of the high 
school course, continue their study in college. It meets the 
requirements for entrance into the Freshman class of colleges of 
the highest rank. Students completing this course are admitted 
upon certificate to any college for women in Georgia, and to all 
other colleges members of the "Association of Colleges and Sec- 
ondary Sphools of the Southern States." The Tubman High 
School is a member of this Association. 

The Modern Laiujnayc and Science Courses are intended for 
students who probably will not go to college, or who expect to 
take an elective course at college. Both courses are planned 
upon somewhat more general lines than the College Preparatory 
course. They include a greater variety of subjects and have 
been carefully planned in accordance with the established prac- 
tice of the modern cosmopolitan high school. 

The Couiniercial Course is jjlanned to prepare students for such 
clerical positions as stenographers, bookkeepers, or general 
office assistants. The course includes two years of Shorthand, 
Bookkeeping, Typewriting, Arithmetic, English, Business Forms 
and Customs, and general office practice. These subjects are 

7 



taken in the third and fourth years of the high school course, 
and are based on two years of general high school subjects. 

GRADUATION 

In order to graduate from the Tubman High School with the 
Diploma of the school, a student must complete one of the courses 
as outlined. Each of these courses gives a total credit of slightly 
more than sixteen (16) Units. A Unit represents one year's 
work in a subject taken five times a week in forty-five minute 
recitations. Upon this basis subects are reckoned in Units or 
fractional parts of a Unit. To receive credit for work done in 
any subject a student must pass in that subject according to the 
school requirements in both daily recitations and examinations. 
These requirements are officially announced at the beginning of 
the school year. They are such as are made in all high-grade 
schools, and must be complied with in every respect before any 
official credit is allowed. 

To students who have only partially completed requirements 
for a Diploma, a Certificate in the subjects completed will be issued. 
No Certificate, however, will be granted to any student who 
finishes the fourth year with a total of less than fourteen (1-4) 
Units, three of which must be in fourth year subjects. Parents 
and students are expected to familiarize themselves with these 
requirements. The regulations are a necessary basis for honest, 
high-grade work. It should be clearly understood that the reg- 
ulations as laid down in this pamphlet will be strictly observed. 

The Courses of Study are so planned that students should, 
with regular attendance and proper application, complete each 
year's work without difficulty. The daily class work is assigned 
upon a basis of about two and one-half hours of home study. 
Except in rare instances, a student who does less than that 
amount of home work will fail in her studies. The daily sched- 
ules are so arranged that the student has one period for the 
preparation of lessons for the following day, the study of library 
references, or for such other preparation as is necessary for the 
class periods. 

REPORTS 

Reports are sent to parents at the end of each month showing 
the records of work done in all subjects, attendance, etc. These 



reports are to be signed by parents and promptly returned to 
the school. It is expected that parents will examine the reports 
carefully and keep themselves informed during the year about 
the progress their daughters are making. The records (as in- 
dicated on the cards), are of the greatest importance. School 
reports, (recitations and examinations), are the records upon 
which graduation is leased. They show at all times the standing 
of students. Parents are earnestly requested to examine them 
carefully month by month. Duplicates of the reports are always 
forwarded to colleges with entrance certificate. High school 
records are becoming more and more a highly important factor 
in securing desirable places in business. Almost invariably 
when students, after leaving school, apply for positions em- 
ployers promptly ask for official high school records. 

The Tubman High School seeks at all times the full and cor- 
dial co-operation of parents. Only under such conditions will 
any girl do her best work. Parents are invited to visit the school 
whenever they choose, and to become acquainted with ' the 
teachers and the general regulations under which the school is 
operated. 



OUTLINE OF COURSES OF STUDY 



The outline following shows the order in which instruction is 
given in the individual subjects. 

Figures and letters indicate the year and term in which the 
subject is taken. Thus, "English 3a" means English as taken in 
the third year, 1st term, or "U. S. History 51)" means American 
History as taken in the 5th year, 2nd term. 

ENGLISH 

' Miss Woods Miss Comey Miss Parks 

Miss Pearce Miss Frank Miss Chiles 

Sub-Frcsliiiiaii ( la-b) — Hitchcock's "junior English Book." and 
Chew's "High School Speller." Grammar. Composition, Literature, 
Spelling. Five periods. 

Freshman ( 2a-l)) — "Everyday English Composition." Bolenius; 
Chew's "High School Speller." Five periods. 



Note — The work in English is practically the same in all courses 
and is required of all students. It covers a period of five years 
with daily recitations. Written and oral composition form a con- 
tinuous and fundamental part of all courses. The classics studied 
are taken, with some exceptions in courses not College Preparatory, 
from the list known as "College Entrance Requirements in English." 

Sophomore (3a-b) — "Everyday English Composition," Bolenius ; 
completed. Five periods. 

Junior ( -l-a-ly) — Genung and Hanson's "Outlines of Rhetoric and 
Composition." 

Coiiinicrcial Course — Bowlin and Marsh's "Vocational English." 
Eive periods. 

Senior (5a-l)) — Genung and Hanson's "Outlines of Rhetoric and 
Composition," completed. 

Commercial Course — Bowlin & Marsh's "Vocational English." 
LATIN 

Miss Hains Miss Abernathy 

Sub-Frcshnuni {Ih) — Classical Course: D'Oogee's "Latin for 
Beginners." Four periods. 

Freshman (3a-b) — Classical Course: D'Ooge's "Latin for Be- 
ginners," completed. Five periods. 

Sophomore (3a-b) — Bennett"s Latin Grammar; four hooks 
Caesar. Five periods. 

Junior (4a-b) — Cicero's Orations. Five periods. 

Senior ( 5a-b) — Virgil's Aeneid. Five periods. 

FRENCH 

Miss Page Miss Anderson 

Sophomore {3a-b) — College Preparatory Course: Eraser and 
Squair's "New Elementary Course." Eive periods. 

Other Courses use the same text book. 

10 



Junior (4a-b) — Fraser and Squair's "New Elementary Course." 
Five periods. 

Note — In all French courses careful attention is given to the 
formation of habits of correct pronunciation. Composition and sim- 
ple conversation in French are stressed. Selections for reading are 
begun as soon as possible. 

Senior (oa-b) — College Preparatory: French, Fraser and Squair's 
"New Elementary Course." Modern Language Course: Chardenal's 
"New French Course." Five periods. 

SPANISH 

Miss Null 

Sophomore (;3a-b) — Commercial Course: Hill and Ford's "First 
Spanish Course." Five periods. 

Junior ( 4a-b ) — Commercial Course: Hill and Ford's "First 
S])anish Course," com])leted. Selected Readings. Five periods. 

MATHEMATICS 

Miss Green Miss Hamilton Miss Thomson 

Miss Braddv Miss Adams 

Sub-freshnuin (la) — W'entworth-Smith's "Essentials of Arith- 
metic," Advanced Book; Wells and Hart's High School Algebra (b). 
Five periods. 

Freslinuni ("-^a-b) — Well's and Hart's "High School Algebra." 
Fundamental Operations; Thorough Drill in Factoring; Fractions 
and Simple Equations. Five periods. 

Sophomore (3a) — Wells and Hart's "High School Algebra," 
completed. Five i)eriods. 

Sophomore (3b) — Wentworth-Smith's "Plane Geometry." Five 
periods. 

Commereial Course (3a-b) — Dooley's "Vocational Mathematics 
for Girls." Four periods. 

Junior (4a-b) — Wentworth-Smith's "Plane Geometry." com- 
pleted. Five periods. 

Senior (5a-b) — Science Course: Wentworth-Smith's "Social 
Geometry," completed. Three periods. 

11 



SCIENCE 

Mrs. Emerson Miss Ward Miss Odom 

Miss Eve Miss Rutledge 

Sitb-Frcshman (la-b) — Kellar and Bishop's "Commercial and 
Industrial Geography." Note — Students who intend to take the 
College Preparatory Course will take this subject only in the first 
term. Five periods. 

Freshman (3a-b) — Clark's "Introduction to Science." Text 
demonstration and individual laboratory work. Five periods. 

Junior (4a-b) — Modern Course : Brownlee"s "Chemistry," (re- 
vised edition). Same for Science Course. Six periods. Text, dem- 
onstration, and individual laboratory work throughout these courses. 
Double laboratory periods. Science Course : Hunter's "Civic Biol- 
ogy." Text, demonstration, and individual laboratory work. Six 
periods. Double laboratory periods. 

Senior (5a-b) — College Preparatory Course: Brownlee"s "Chem- 
istry." (revised). Science Course: Carhart and Chute's "Physics 
with Applications." Six periods. Double lal)oratory periods. 

Hunters Civic Biology (elective). 

All science laboratories are thoroughly equipped for approved 
work in the sul)jects above named. 

HISTORY. CIVICS, ECONOMICS 

Miss Flisch Mrs. Hurst 

Miss Boatwright Miss Hamilton 

Siib-Frcshman (la-b) — Morey's' "Ancient People." Five periods. 

Freshman (Sa-b) — All courses except College Preparatory: 
Hughes's "Community Civics." Five periods. 

Sophomore (3a-b) — West's "Modern Progress." Five periods. 

Junior (4a-b) — Modern Language Course: "American Eco- 
nomic Life'". Burdi. Four periods. 

Senior (oa-b) — Forman's "Advanced American History." Five 
periods. 

Note — The school library is well supplied with reference books 
for collateral reading in all courses in history. The library facilities 

12 



for this purpose are being enlarged year by year. Regular and 
systematic use of the library under direction of the teachers, is re- 
quired of all students. 

HOME ECONOMICS 
]\Iiss Clark Miss Haddock 

First Year — Domestic Art ; plain hand sewing ; instruction in 
the use and care of sewing machines ; use of bought patterns. 
Application: mending, sewing-apron, under-garments, simple 
dress, blouse or shirt waist, house-hold linens. Two periods. 

Second Year — Domestic Science; ])racti al cookery based on food 
princii)les. Theory in the first half year based on composition, 
nutritive and economic values and digestibility of foods ; in the 
second half year based on planning a simple cottage, location, 
building material, interior decoration, furnishings, water supply, 
heating, lighting, ventilation, etc. Three periods. 

Third ]'ear — Domestic Art. The work in the third year is sim- 
ilar in plan to that of the first year, tht)Ugh more complex, as 
the greater maturity of the students may warrant. Theory : 
study of textiles, economics of buying fabrics, hygiene of cloth- 
ing, etc. Two periods. 

Fourth Year — Domestic Science. Practical cookery, based on 
meal sequence and the study of varied dietaries. Theory based 
on the stud}' of dietaries, the science of food preparation, house- 
hold sanitation, and economy of time, labor and money in the 
home, keeping of accounts, etc. Two periods. 

Note — It is proposed to correlate the courses in Domestic 
Science closely with the courses in Drawing and Applied Art. 
This correlation may necessitate slight changes in the courses in 
Domestic Science as outlined above. 

The rooms for Ijoth cooking and sewing are equipped with 
every necessary appliance for practical courses that every stu- 
dent may apply in her own home. 

APPLIED ART 

Miss Comfort 

First Year — Free-hand drawing; color study; desi^^n. These sub- 
jects are intended as a working basis for the following vears. 
Four ]:)eriods. 

13 



Second Year — General designing; as related to clothing, home 
decorations, etc. Four periods. 

TJiird Year — Mechanical drawing; lettering; house planning, 
interior decorations, etc. Four periods. 

FoiirtJi Year — Commercial art ; designing, poster study, illustra- 
tions, etc. Four periods. 

COMMERCIAL COURSE 
Miss Hollingsvvorth Miss White 

Courses in Bookkeeping-, Stenography, and Typewriting; 
Arithmetic, business forms and practice are offered in the third 
and fourth year classes. These courses are thorough and prac- 
tical. They are based upon the more general subjects of the 
first and second years. They are designed to prepare students 
for positions in business. 

The Gregg system of stenography and the touch system of 
typewriting are taught and used throughout the course. 

The school is supplied with a sufficient number of Remington 
and Underwood typewriters for both instruction and practice 
requirements, and with all necessary appliances fi)r instruction 
in commercial subjects. 

Text books : Gregg Shorthand Manual ; Gregg Speed Studies ; 
Rational Typewriting; 20th Century Bookkeeping; Office Train- 
ing for Stenographers. 

PHYSICAL TRAINING 

Miss IvEY Miss Plunkett 

This work is required of all girls except those excused upon a 
physician's certificate. Its purpose is health through physical exer- 
cises prescribed and supervised by the teacher in charge. The 
gymnasium is well equipped with all necessary apparatus. Indi- 
vidual steel lockers and hot and cold shower baths are provided. 
In addition to the gymnasium work, all forms of field sports are 
taught. The school has ample facilities for all out-door games. 

14 



Every girl is required to provide herself with an inexpensive 
gymnasium suit according to the directions of the teacher. This 
uniform consists of dark serge bloomers, middy blouse, black 
stockings and tennis shoes. 

MUSIC 

Miss Turner 

Courses in \'ocal Music (in groups) are offered in all classes. 

Text books and details of courses annovmced after organization 
of the classes. 

Assembly singing at morning opening exercises required of all 
students. 

A School Glee Club will be organized early in the first term.